Small SCU Logo2.png

Post

SCU Overview and Questions from Congressional Hearing on UAP

SCIENTIFIC COALITION FOR UAP STUDIES OVERVIEW AND QUESTIONS FROM CONGRESSIONAL HEARING ON UAP


SCU Applauds First Step In Process Of Congressional Engagement On UAP, Requests Answers Following Testimony



May 24 – The Scientific Coalition for UAP Studies (SCU), a fact-driven organization of scientists, academics, and research professionals dedicated to exploring anomalous phenomena known around the world as UAPs, applauds the US House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence’s Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation Subcommittee’s (C3) first Congressional hearing on this subject in more than 50 years.


“The Hearing on UAP is a great first start. The SCU applauds the commitment of the Airborne Object Identification and Management Synchronization Group (AOIMSG) to make public as much information as possible on the subject of UAP,” said Robert Powell, SCU executive board member. “Their efforts to remove the stigma from the subject also is beneficial in increasing the number of reports from pilots and professionals, and it helps promote scientific investigations by academia.”


In order to effectively guide the crucial next steps in future work, the SCU submits the following questions and recommendations:


1. The Hearing on UAP is a great first start and SCU applauds the willingness of the AOIMSG (Airborne Object Identification and Management Synchronization Group) to make public as much information as possible on the subject of UAP. Their efforts to remove stigma from the subject also is beneficial in increasing the number of reports from pilots and professionals and it helps promote scientific investigations by academia.


2. Future AOIMSG investigations would benefit from collecting incident reports beyond just training areas. Mr. Bray indicated that they were looking primarily at incursions in military training areas. It is important to look beyond training areas and include all military facilities, nuclear facilities, commercial airliner reports, and objects in near-earth orbit. Putting the training incidents into a larger spatial context will enable the military to understand the effect on military training areas. Are UAP reports from military training areas more frequent, or unusual in some way, or are they part of a wide-spread or randomly distributed UAP reporting phenomenon?


3. Future AOIMSG investigations would also benefit from an understanding of the historical record of UAP reports. The statement from Mr. Bray that the UAP Task Force did not have in its holdings information on many previous UAP/UFO events involving U.S. nuclear facilities indicates that there might be a knowledge gap regarding the long history of military UAP reports and the patterns found within them. This is an area where civilian research groups with a deep understanding of historical context, such as the SCU, could point the AOIMSG towards relevant data and analyses.


4. Taken at face value, the eleven near-misses out of 400 cases that Mr. Bray indicated are in their possession is a staggering percentage, especially when compared to the historical reporting records. Numbers like these need context, which speaks to the urgency for the AOIMSG to look at data more widely in both time and space.


5. Consider releasing all reports, data, and collection techniques and capabilities on the unclassified incidents that AOIMSG is tracking. An example is the 2004 USS Nimitz Strike Group Encounter. SCU Understands the need to protect sources and methods the US Government uses; providing background on the types of collection mechanisms will further provide the scientific community of interest with data points to drive research through the scientific method.


***


The Scientific Coalition for UAP Studies (SCU) promotes and encourages the rigorous scientific examination of Unidentified Aerospace Phenomena (UAP), commonly known as Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs). SCU comprises scientists, former military, law enforcement officials, and other professionals, utilizing scientific principles, methodologies, and practices to advance the study of UAP observed and reported around the globe.


The Scientific Coalition for UAP Studies is a charitable organization (501(c)(3). Contributions to SCU are tax-deductible.


###


411 views0 comments